Saturday, February 6, 2016

Some good instructional videos

Gentlemen,

These are some good videos to watch, especially for the beginners, but everyone can benefit!

Take a look!

Coach Carey




Ultimate Guide to Youth Lacrosse - Attack and Midfield
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s0q-uM_fJr8


Ultimate Guide to Youth Lacrosse - Defense and Goalie
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LLkR_pqye6M


"Quint's Qs"
This is a good video from some years ago (20 yrs ago!) with Quint Kessenich and other good players discussing some basics.  The gear is old school, but the teaching is pretty solid.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oudNR-Mq71I

Mark Millon's Offensive Wizardry
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jDSx6miqK04


Chris Bocklet and Steele Stanwick Shooting Clinic
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H-ou0_Jzosk


More Chris Bocklet and Steele Stanwick Shooting Clinic
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cz83POKTTZo



Game video:

OLD SCHOOL!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8C8lP_1qNJM
1989 NCAA Championship Lacrosse - thought by many to be the BEST game ever.




Friday, February 5, 2016

UVA Lacrosse Alum Ryan Tucker gives talk to HS Players at Norfolk Academy

Bulldog Captains Get Pep Talk From Major League Lacrosse Player


The habits of self-discipline forged through lacrosse training were at the heart of a motivational talk by Ryan Tucker, a lacrosse star at University of Virginia and current midfielder for the Atlanta Blaze in the MLL.

Tucker, a Teaching Associate at Norfolk Academy, was the guest speaker at the Ruffin Bulldog Leadership-Captains’ Club. Tucker described his transformation from ”a ball of energy” to a formidable player for University of Virginia, named three times to the ACC All-Academic team and in his senior year (2015), one of UVa’s five team captains and an All-American.  He played on the 2012 USA Under-19 Team, which won a gold medal at the World Championships in Turku, Finland; that team was coached by Norfolk Academy Varsity Boys’ Lacrosse Coach Tom Duquette.

Throughout his life, Tucker listened carefully to advice from his coaches, starting with his parents. From his mother, the head coach of women’s lacrosse at Johns Hopkins University for more than two decades, he learned to have a positive attitude. From his father, who has coached lacrosse scholastically and for MLL teams, he was taught to be humble.

He absorbed those lessons and a skill set in the sport strong enough to catapult him from The Gilman School in Baltimore, where he played both soccer and lacrosse, to University of Virginia’s powerhouse team, which has won five NCAA titles. However, once he arrived, he had much more learning to do. Tucker ruefully described his behavior as a freshman at his first collegiate practices, when he was so intent on demonstrating enthusiasm that he yelled “Woo-yah!” incessantly, even when his teammates missed a shot.

Steele Stanwick, captain of the team and a two-time USILA first-team All-American, helped Tucker settle down and work on his consistency as a player. Stanwick taught him “never take shortcuts.”

From UVa. Coach Dom Starsia, Tucker learned a variety of lessons, many of them about kindness. He recalled that Starsia closed every practice with the reminder, “We have a lot to be thankful for.” The coach also told his players, “Always be kind to the pizza dude”—a saying that had nothing to do with late-night dorm nutrition, but rather meant “always be kind to everyone, and be careful not to judge people.”

Over the four years that Tucker played on the team, he grew to understand the depth of his coach’s refrain, “Dazzle me with your consistency.” Living up to that one saying meant adopting a strict routine to maximize performance in the classroom and on the field. After a brief and disastrous freshman-year detour into sleeping late and missing morning classes, Tucker said he settled into a routine of getting up early, working out, and attending to all of his academic classes, to the point that he became “a master scheduler” of his own time.

Currently, he is training for the Atlanta Blaze season, so he goes to bed at about 8 p.m. in order to arise at 5 a.m. for an intensive workout led by Norfolk Academy Varsity Tennis Coach Michael Duquette ’99. He follows a strict diet, high in protein and vegetables, and that means cooking his own meals to fit his training regime.

The advice he offered students for turning a game after a tough start seemed to apply more broadly as an approach to progress on any goal: “Make one little play at a time. Just one at a time, don’t try to do too much all at once.”

Monday, February 1, 2016

Virginia Lacrosse 2016: Attack Preview

Virginia Lacrosse 2016: Attack Preview

Rob Carr/Getty Images
Lacrosse season is just around the corner. We're going to get you up to speed for the opener against Loyola!
In just 12 short days, the No.11 Virginia Men's Lacrosse will take the field against No.7 Loyola to open their season. In the next two weeks, we here at Streaking the Lawn will prepare you for the upcoming season by previewing each unit (attack, midfield, defense, and specialists), recapping last season, looking ahead to this season and the ACC, checking out our new first year class, podcasting (with a special guest!), and making our predictions for the season.
Today, we're kicking it off with the preview of Virginia's attack. Each of our previews will feature "The Big Three" that we predict to start for the Hoos, a player to watch for, and some other options available to Coach Starsia.
The Big Three:
James Pannell - The sharpshooting fourth year returns this season from a lower extremity injury that sidelined him for the last nine games last year. Pannell participated in fall ball for the Hoos, and should be back to 100% for the season. Over his 2.5 (ish) seasons, Pannell has 57 goals and 16 assists. He had a six-goal outing against Cornell last year, showing his potential. If he can get back to that level, Pannell is a threat to score against anyone. He moves well off ball and has a powerful outside shot.
Here's highlights from his six goal game last season (Pannell in #32):

Ryan Lukacovic - Steele Stanwick, the redux (or on his way). Lukacovic shows awareness around the crease and has excellent vision. His second year (last season), he was second on the team in points with 22 goals and team-leading 27 assists. Lukacovic did have 23 turnovers last season, a number that should come down with more experience this year. He's particularly adept behind the crease, especially when he gets his defender hung up. Over the course of the season, Luka was one of the most steady players last year, notching a point in every game as the Hoos struggled with injuries on both ends of the field. His crease roll has improved and can make moves to the goal in one on one situations. His consistent play will be crucial for Virginia to see success this season.
Mike D'Amario - While D'Amario was used frequently in extra man situations last season, he could land the third starting spot this year. He only had three goals (on nine shots) last year, but has developed his strong lefty shot and can be a big asset.
Watch for This Guy:
Joe French -  French is other option for the third starting position. He's Canadian, and comes with the box league moves they're known for. He definitely has the most flare on this attack, and can fit both passes and shots into spaces they have no business being. French saw action in 11 of Virginia's 15 games last season, scoring four goals and grabbing seven ground balls. He's very vocal and provides a great shot of energy to the attack.
Other Options:
Tyler Breen, Mikey Herring, Townsend Brown - The reserves for attack (or those listed as attack on the Virginia roster) are young with a first year (Herring), a red shirt first year (Brown), and a second year (Breen). Breen saw action in just two games last season, notching an assist in Virginia's rout of VMI. Brown, besides having an awesome name, was No.34 on Inside Lacrosse's attack rankings coming out of high school. He's the tallest player on the attack (6'2"), and could see some time at midfield as well. Herring comes to Charlottesville from Dedham, Massachusetts.

Monday, January 4, 2016

Team USA Roster Announced for Jan. 10 Exhibition vs. Denver

Team USA Roster Announced for Jan. 10 Exhibition vs. Denver

from press release
BALTIMORE, Jan. 4 – US Lacrosse has announced the U.S. Men's National Team roster for this weekend's exhibition against 2015 NCAA champion University of Denver at the inaugural Team USASpring Premiere in Bradenton, Fla. The game is set for 11 a.m. ET Sunday, Jan. 10 at IMG Academy, and will be streamed live on USLacrosse.org.
The 24-player roster includes nine players from the 2014 U.S. men's national team that earned the silver medal at the Federation of International Lacrosse (FIL) World Championship in Denver, Colo. The exhibition is John Danowski's first game as head coach of the 2018 U.S. men's national team, which will go for a record 10th gold medal at the 2018 FIL World Championship in Manchester, England. Team USA's assistant coaches and support staff were announced in December.
The University of Denver, led by head coach Bill Tierney — who guided Team USA to a gold medal at the 1998 FIL World Championship — won its first NCAA title in May with a 10-5 victory over the University of Maryland.
The Team USA roster by position, with MLL and college teams noted (numerical roster follows below):

Attack

Matt Danowski, Chesapeake Bayhawks, Duke
Marcus Holman, Ohio Machine, North Carolina *
Rob Pannell, New York Lizards, Cornell *
Casey Powell, Florida Launch, Syracuse +#
Jordan Wolf, Rochester Rattlers, Duke

Midfield

Brent Adams, Boston Cannons, Fairfield
Jake Bernhardt, Ohio Machine, Maryland
Ned Crotty, Rochester Rattlers, Duke *^
John Haus, Charlotte Hounds, Maryland
David Lawson, New York Lizards, Duke *
Paul Rabil, New York Lizards, Johns Hopkins *^ (injured and unable to participate)
Tom Schreiber, Ohio Machine, Princeton
Jeremy Sieverts, Denver Outlaws, Maryland
Drew Snider, Denver Outlaws, Maryland
Justin Turri, Atlanta Blaze, Duke

Defense

Tucker Durkin, Florida Launch, Johns Hopkins *
Michael Evans, Chesapeake Bayhawks, Johns Hopkins *
Ryan Flanagan, Charlotte Hounds, North Carolina
Joe Fletcher, New York Lizards, Loyola
Kyle Hartzell, New York Lizards, Salisbury *
Scott Ratliff, Boston Cannons, Loyola

Faceoff

Brendan Fowler, Charlotte Hounds, Duke
Greg Gurenlian, New York Lizards, Penn State *

Goalie

Drew Adams, New York Lizards, Penn State *
John Galloway, Rochester Rattlers, Syracuse
* Member of 2014 U.S. men's national team
^ Member of 2010 U.S. men's national team
+ Member of 2006 U.S. men's national team
# Member of 1998 U.S. men's national team
No.
First
Last
Pos.
Ht.
Wt.
Current Team
College
1
Marcus
Holman
A
5'10
185
Ohio Machine
North Carolina
2
David
Lawson
M
6'1
200
New York Lizards
Duke
3
Rob
Pannell
A
5'9
195
New York Lizards
Cornell
4
Matt
Danowski
A
6'0
200
Chesapeake Bayhawks
Duke
6
Jordan
Wolf
A
5'9
170
Rochester Rattlers
Duke
8
Brent
Adams
M
6'1
165
Boston Cannons
Fairfield
10
Justin
Turri
M
6'3
215
Atlanta Blaze
Duke
12
Ned
Crotty
M
6'2
185
Rochester Rattlers
Duke
13
Brendan
Fowler
FO
5'11
195
Charlotte Hounds
Duke
14
Drew
Adams
G
6'2
200
New York Lizards
Penn State
15
John
Galloway
G
6'0
188
Rochester Rattlers
Syracuse
17
Joe
Fletcher
D
6'2
185
New York Lizards
Loyola
20
Jeremy
Sieverts
M
6'3
205
Denver Outlaws
Maryland
21
Scott
Ratliff
D
6'0
185
Boston Cannons
Loyola
22
Casey
Powell
A
6'1
190
Florida Launch
Syracuse
23
Drew
Snider
M
6'0
175
Denver Outlaws
Maryland
24
Ryan
Flanagan
D
6'5
215
Charlotte Hounds
North Carolina
26
Tom
Schreiber
M
6'0
190
Ohio Machine
Princeton
28
John
Haus
M
6'0
185
Charlotte Hounds
Maryland
30
Jake
Bernhardt
M
6'0
190
Ohio Machine
Maryland
32
Greg
Gurenlian
FO
6'1
225
New York Lizards
Penn State
33
Michael
Evans
D
6'2
205
Chesapeake Bayhawks
Johns Hopkins
55
Tucker
Durkin
D
6'2
210
Florida Launch
Johns Hopkins
81
Kyle
Hartzell
D
6'2
180
New York Lizards
Salisbury
The Team USA Spring Premiere also includes two U.S. Women's National Team exhibitions against the University of Florida (3 p.m. ET) and Syracuse University (5 p.m. ET) on Saturday, Jan. 9. Following the U.S. men's national team game on Sunday, Jan. 10, the U.S. men's under-19 team will take on Canada's men's under-19 team at 1:30 p.m. ET in preparation for the 2016 FIL Under-19 World Championship in Coquitlam, British Columbia. All four games will be streamed live on USLacrosse.org.
The U.S. men's national team has amassed a 59-4 all-time record in international play, claiming gold at nine World Championships (1967, 1974, 1982, 1986, 1990, 1994, 1998, 2002, 2010).
The world champion U.S. men's national team trains and plays using best-in-class products provided by Nike (apparel and footwear), STX (equipment), and Cascade (helmets). Nationwide and Sweat X are official sponsors of Team USA. For more information on the U.S. Men's National Team, visituslacrosse.org/teamusa. Follow the team on social media @USLacrosse and use #USAMLAX on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, Vine and Snapchat.

Saturday, January 2, 2016

Roots of lacrosse

Imagine playing lacrosse in the style that George Catlin depicted when he saw Native Americans playing the sport!


Wednesday, December 23, 2015

Lax Homework: Read Coach Peter Lasagna's Columns from Inside Lacrosse!



Peter Lasagna is the head coach of the Bates College Men's Lacrosse team, where I played college lacrosse.  He is a great coach, a wonderful guy, and also a terrific commenter on our beloved sport of lacrosse.  I commend his many articles to anyone who wants to learn about the game - and about the state of the game today.  

Click below to see an archive of his columns in Inside Lacrosse

Coach Carey



Access the archive of his great columns HERE

http://www.insidelacrosse.com/author/Peter-Lasagna

Tuesday, December 22, 2015

Article: Stop Rushing to Build Baby Athletes

An important article from Outside Magazine:


Stop Rushing to Build Baby Athletes

The pressure to enlist kids in competitive sports has us putting four-year-olds on the soccer field. It’s clear they don’t know what they’re doing. And it may be a more harmful decision than you realize.


Earlier this fall, my husband and I wrestled with the question of whether or not to sign our girls, ages five and seven, up for organized sports. On one hand, we want to expose them to the benefits of team play. On the other, we were reluctant to cram our schedule with twice-weekly practices and Saturday morning games when there are so many family adventures calling, like hiking and mountain biking, that we could all do together. 
Not so long ago, youth team sports used to start in late elementary school or even middle school, but now it’s standard to see soccer teams for the under-five set and pre-school ice hockey leagues. By seven or eight, kids are already being funneled into highly competitive travel teams, many of which play all year. While it’s important to develop a lifelong habit of physical activity early in life, starting so young and specializing too soon has its risks. It makes kids more prone to burnout, injury, and inactivity later in life, according to the Changing The Game Project, an initiative designed to bring balance back to the hyper-competitive world of youth sports. 
Still, with age four becoming the new norm for participating in team sports, I was afraid that if our daughter didn’t start early, she’d miss out and fall behind. It sounds neurotic, but I’m not alone. “You get sucked into thinking that if you don’t get your kid on a T-ball team when he’s five, he’s going to flunk out of school and end up living in a ditch,” says Toby Brooks, a father of two and an associate professor of athletic training at Texas Tech’s Health Science Center. 
Read the rest HERE