Wednesday, April 27, 2016

When Your Child Wants to Become a College Athlete

When Your Child Wants to Become a College Athlete

across the educational pipeline with arrows.jpg
Editor’s note: This is the third in a series of blog posts reflecting on the educational pipeline by Karen Gross, former president of Southern Vermont College. She has taught students from preschool through graduate school. Her first piece covered breaking down pre-K–20 silos, and her second piece covered changes in the college admission process. Her next piece will focus on reimagining preschool education. Her children’s book, Lady Lucy’s Quest, was just released.
 
Many children dream of becoming an athlete in college and then professionally. Parents are excited by the idea of their child receiving a full-ride athletic scholarship, not realizing how challenging it is to obtain and retain one. However, how high school students “get into the collegiate game” is complicated and filled with pitfalls.
 
Athletic recruiting is a big business. Many books, articles, and movies explore the issue. (See The Blind Side.) NCAA’s rules are numerous. Some provisions make perfect sense. For instance, a student cannot be considered a prospect before ninth grade. Some measures seem absurd. Consider that a college recruiter cannot even buy a cup of coffee for a Division III transfer recruit when visiting that student at his or her original institution.
 
I am familiar with the vagaries of collegiate and professional athletics from being in the trenches both as a parent of a Division I athlete and an educator at a Division III institution. Our son attended a sports academy in his last years of high school after having been a student at an independent K–12 school. He was recruited and competed as a Division I athlete, but he then transferred out of that DI college to a university that did not offer DI sports. He has since graduated from college, earned a PhD, and is now a professor.
 
I’ve established my own bona fides in athletic recruiting in many ways. While I was president of Southern Vermont College, an NCAA Division III school, I served as president of the New England Collegiate Conference and also participated in the NCAA Division III President’s Advisory Group. I have personally recruited athletes (I’m four for four), and have worked with a remarkable NCAA lawyer on issues involving NCAA rules and possible infractions. I have also written about collegiate athletics for an NCAA magazine and for the online publication CollegeAD.
 
Based on my experience, I offer six key points to help guide parents, teachers, school counselors, and coaches of students attending independent schools. 
 

Point 1. The NCAA Is More Than Just Football and Basketball.

NCAA’s moneyed sports, with their televised football and basketball championships, receive the lion’s share of public and media attention. Individual NCAA-sanctioned sports that many independent schools offer, such as tennis, golf, and track and field, receive a limited amount of attention.

Read it all HERE at NAIS Blog

Wednesday, April 20, 2016

@EAboyslacrosse coach Hayes to step down after season

@EAboyslacrosse coach Hayes to step down after season

Wednesday, 13th April 2016 

Categories Boy's/Men'sHigh School  
 
By Chris Goldberg
Phillylacrosse.com, Posted 4/13/16

Andy Hayes has announced he will step down as head boys’ lacrosse coach at Episcopal Academy effective the end of the season.
Hayes has compiled a 132-106 record in his 12 seasons and informed his players on Friday following a game vs. St. Anthony’s (N.Y.)
Andy Hayes will step down following the season as Episcopal Academy head coach
Andy Hayes will step down following the season as Episcopal Academy head coach
“Episcopal Academy is a great school and this is a great job,” said Hayes, who also was an assistant for two years. “It’s been awesome to spend a quarter of my life coaching here.
“For 12 years I have been the steward of a program steeped in tradition, expectation, and national recognition. My predecessor, John Wynne still unfairly sits outside of the PA Lacrosse Hall of Fame but I never once took for granted what he had built. His success motivated me every season to meet his standard for excellence in the Episcopal Academy lacrosse program.”
The Churchmen, fighting injuries all year, won their first game Tuesday, 10-2 over Penn Charter, after dropping their first six, four by one goal and two in overtime. EA has always played a national schedule and Hayes said it has prepared the team well for the rigors of the Inter-Ac League. The reason he chose to announce his decision now is to help the school get a jump on choosing a new coach.
“The reason for the timing was to allow the school to make preparations to hire an exceptional coach for the next year,” said Hayes.
Hayes taught Honors Biology and Biology for 10 years at Episcopal Academy, but stepped down three years ago to concentrate fully on his job as CEO of NXT Sports.
Hayes said the program’s finest moment occurred in 2012 when EA shocked Haverford School to win the Inter-Ac Invitational and cap his best season (19-5). He took pride in knowing his team has competed regularly with league titans Haverford School and Malvern Prep with much smaller enrollments.
“Coaching the boys lacrosse team always presented the toughest of challenges as we played a national schedule every year in the hope of best preparing for the daunting Inter-Ac League,” he said. “Senior classes over the years adopted various slogans to guide them through their seasons but one became the battle cry for our most successful team.
“‘No excuses’ was the mantra of our 2012 Championship team which upended Haverford 15-11 in our final game. Those boys epitomized what it means to play lacrosse at Episcopal. They outworked, out-thought, and outplayed everyone that May and beat bigger, stronger, faster, and more talented teams on the road to raising the trophy. That phrase has stayed with the program to this day publicly, but really was the cornerstone for our success over the past 10 years.”
Hayes has coached 16 All-Americans and 49 all-league players. One senior, face-off specialist Christian Feliziani, has been named to the USA U-19 team that will play this summer in the FIL Championships in Coquitlam, B.C. In each of the last four years, EA has advanced to the Inter-Ac Invitational/Challenge semifinals.
EA athletic director Regina Buggy gave this statement:
“Andy Hayes will be stepping down as The Episcopal Academy’s head boys’ lacrosse coach at the end of this season. While we are saddened by his decision, we are beyond grateful for Andy’s commitment to our school and to our students for the past 12 years.
“Andy has helped to build a strong, successful, and nationally recognized lacrosse program here, and he will be sorely missed. We are now forming a search committee and, with Andy’s help, we look forward to finding the best person to follow in his footsteps and continue to steward an excellent lacrosse program here at Episcopal.”
Hayes credited his assistant coaches, most notably Will Gibbs, who has been with him for nine years; as well as John Bodnar, Bryan McDermott, Marty Kupprion, Kevin O’Brien, Khari Baten and more.
“All of these coaches have contributed to our success here at Episcopal and I appreciate all that they did for the program and the boys,” said Hayes, who also thanked head of school TJ Locke, Buggy and associate director of athletics Jim Farrell.
“Finally, I would like to thank all of my former and current players. It is not easy being an Episcopal Academy lacrosse player. The standard of excellence that we strive for would not be possible if these boys had not continued to represent the school and the program in an exemplary manner with their effort and their play. Our schedules routinely were amongst the toughest in the country and presented our teams with opportunities to play against the best lacrosse players in the country.
“I never made it easy for these boys and they always met the challenge.”
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Tuesday, April 19, 2016

"What's up with the Hoos this year?"


An excerpt from an interesting perspective!

"What's up with the Hoos this year?" 

By Seward Totty at "CampusPressbox.com" 
The Cavaliers have long been considered one of the sport’s dynasties, with 16 ACC titles and seven national championships as proof of their long time dominance. However, with yesterday’s loss to Duke, the men have failed to win a conference game for the second year in a row and also have missed qualifying for the ACC tournament for the third consecutive year. Even more glaring is the fact that the team is 1-16 in its last 17 ACC games and has lost twelve straight. This is not Virginia lacrosse. Not even close. 
Longtime coach Dom Starsia had compiled a record of 267-95 (.738) in his 23 seasons prior to 2015, but this year’s team sits at 6-7 and Dom’s tenure may be drawing to a close. There has been a pervasive pall over the program ever since the tragic murder of women’s lacrosse player Yeardley Love by men’s player George Huguely in a fit of jealous rage in May 2010. Ironically, the men’s team did manage to win the 2011 national championship with an amazing and unexpected performance in the national tournament. However, the start of Huguely’s trial in February 2012 and the attendant negative publicity and focus on Starsia’s oversight of the program seems to have marked the turning point for the program. 
The negative publicity has affected recruiting to some degree but certainly there are other factors at work. Chief among them being the prevalence of early scholarship offers to ninth and tenth graders. Frankly these offers come too early to be accurate predictors of a player’s ability to succeed at the college level. Every coach agrees with this and hopes for reform, but until it does coaches feel the pressure to offer these kids before the next coach does. Virginia, for whatever reason, has seemingly failed to identify the players who continue to grow and mature over the course of their high school playing years and as a result the team lacks the star power that UVA is accustomed to. 
The spreading popularity of the game has given rise to new college programs that have diluted the pool of available talent. The University of Denver, the reigning NCAA champion, only began playing lacrosse in 1984. By comparison, Virginia has played varsity lacrosse for 87 years. 
Virginia generally is patient with its coaches, especially those who have had the success that Starsia has had, but the pressure is on Starsia to fix the program’s problems and fix them yesterday. Another winless ACC campaign and no NCAA and Starsia may be encouraged to retire and allow the school to bring in new leadership.


Monday, April 18, 2016

USILA/Nike Coaches' Poll for Division III for April 18th

USILA/Nike Coaches' Poll for Division III for April 18th

The United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association has released its USILA/Nike Division III Men's Lacrosse Coaches' Poll for April 18th. The rankings appear below. They will also appear soon on the Polls page, where you'll find a weekly poll matrix for the season as well as links to teams' schedules and scores.

Rank  Team                       Pts (1st)    Prev.
  1   Salisbury (17-0)           378 (18)       1
  2   RIT (12-0)                 362 (1)        2
  3   Tufts (11-1)               340            3
  4   St. Lawrence (12-1)        307            5
  5   Denison (12-1)             303            4
  6   Gettysburg (10-2)          267            9
  7   Amherst (10-3)             252            6
  8   Ithaca (12-1)              234           12
  9   Middlebury (9-4)           215           10
 10   York (14-3)                196            7
 11   Stevenson (10-4)           175           14
 12   Bowdoin (9-3)              144            8
 13   Ohio Wesleyan (9-3)        140           11
 14   Bates (8-3)                126           13
 15   Western New England (10-3) 103           17
 16   Cabrini (9-4)               82           15
 17   RPI (9-2)                   80           19
 18   Ursinus (10-2)              66           16
 19   Nazareth (10-3)             57           18
 20   Wesleyan (9-3)              45           NR

Also receiving votes: Stevens, Keene State, Washington & Lee, Roanoke, Dickinson, Cortland, Frostburg State, Hampden-Sydney

You control what you can control.. ~Dom Starsia #qftpp

You control what you can control, and what you can control is your effort every day. ~Dom Starsia